Training Periodization


by Perfect Skating January 15, 2019

Why Pre-Planning Now will help your player grow and be ready for Training Camp!

Did you just say Training Camp?  I hear ya, it sounds crazy but preparation delivers excellence, and proper preparation takes planning.  It’s all about the purpose and this takes periodization.  Hit it right and your athlete grows, develops and is ready to tackle their next big jump with confidence and increased performance. 

Today’s athlete is bombarded with try-out opportunities.  Minor and youth hockey programs are constantly offering pre-tryout combines during the spring and off-season to “prepare” athletes for what it’s like to attend a try-out with their organization, meet the coaches, get some familiarity with their concepts while giving them an opportunity to get a first look at your athlete.  Junior teams do it to.  Right from the CHL down to Jr. “C”, offering “development” camps that pitch development and an experience of what it’s like to be part of their organization.  The catch?  They cost money.  What is the ROI?

Long Term athlete development, periodization, and the advantage of working with a personal coach or organization that knows your athlete inside and out... Does this not sound better than a one-off “experience” with your AAA hockey team or Junior team that drafted you in the 7th round?  Let’s face it ROI takes times.  It takes a plan that’s custom and periodized for your athlete.  It takes a lot of quality work, the right progressions, the right detail and the challenge and quality coaching that keeps athletes work ethic and deliberate practice accountable.  Do you know why PS, it’s method, and its coaches are regarded as the very best development coaches in the world?  Everything we do is calculated, there is no guess work.  Our work is absolute.  Why leave your athlete’s development to chance?  Plan now to put your athlete in the best possible position so they can dictate their way through training camp, not be reactive in the moment.

Invest in you, not in in them.  The biggest mistake most people make in their lives is not investing enough in their own internal fabric.  Deep DNA.  They get fooled with quick fix pills and programs pitching miracle working weight loss, strength and mental wellness.  It’s the same thing in the hockey industry.  It’s actually pretty crazy and amazingly so many parents get fooled and tricked by programs that produce no ROI. 

So, how to navigate the treacherous waters?  Start planning now.  Start by analyzing your athlete’s try-out schedule and when he/she needs to peak.  Then work backwards with an idea of how much ice time it’s going to take to get them ready.  Evaluate your athlete’s strengths and weaknesses to decide what might be an appropriate speciality focus after a comprehensive baseline.  That would be a great start! Then reach out to quality program that can discuss your athlete needs and put together a plan.  When our coaches sit down with families, we get the whole spectrum.  You have too.  If you don’t, athletes just don’t spike.  We like spike, aka performance spike, that’s what we live for! 

When to train what?  That’s the periodization of a program.  Are we working GPP, Movement, Skill, Speed, Agility, Quickness, all of them at the same time? In modules?  How to figure out the perfect blend based on days of the week, months, timing? That’s where our method partners with our planning phases to formulate the perfect plan.  It’s done right, communicated, and held accountable.  The result? Performance just spikes.  It’s a mathematical guarantee.  One that’s backed by NHL organizations and over 200 current NHL players.  Why take a chance with sub-par programming that has no interest in you?

So, what’s a good sample plan?  Most competitive players are down the stretch of their seasons, most will be done well before March/Spring Break.  That frees up time.  Does my athlete need a little break and start working in the spring on some GPP type movement and skill that they haven’t received during the season with their teams?  Do they need to focus on preparing for a minor hockey or Jr. tryout in the spring?  Maybe they need a break and focus on becoming a multi-sport athlete and then plan to hit the ice for 3-4 weeks in July and August leading up to their tryouts.  It’s really a personal thing and it depends on how you’ve periodized your training throughout the year.  

Last year, Jack Eichel was working on his skills 2 weeks after the season.  He wasn’t working hard, he used that time to be deliberate about some little nuances that he wanted to improve in his game.  He then continued to ramp his training (periodization) so he could be ready for training camp.  Using the NHL example, most guys finish the season in April or May and don’t start to skate until Mid-July.  They take a couple of months, let their bodies heal, become better athletes and start a comprehensive plan to peak for training camp.  We like the idea of taking a break, it’s so refreshing for the nervous system and remember, playing the piano can help you become a better hockey player, it’s all about creating a plethora of nervous systems connections, everything your athlete does away from the rink plays a role.  Taking a break can facilitate those patterns and give the brain another puzzle to figure out. That’s good for the brain and builds new synapses.

So, now’s the time.  Don’t wait until after March/Spring break.  Get your athlete’s Spring/Summer plan figured out now.  Reach out to PS Franchisees and discuss the perfect plan. 

Choosing the right partner organization is going to create SPIKE! 




Perfect Skating
Perfect Skating

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